Tag Archives: patagonia

Patagonia Houdini jacket review

 

Material: 1oz 15-denier Triple rip-stop nylon (w/ DWR treatment)

Features: Zippered exterior chest pocket, adjustable hood/hem

Weight: 4.3oz

Cost: $125.00


    This jacket fits in my other jacket’s chest pocket, no joke.  At 4.3 ounces, this is THE lightest ‘shell’ or piece of outerwear I have ever owned.  This versatile item deserves a place in everyone’s pack.

    Let’s set the record straight – I would NOT consider this a true shell or even a soft shell.  Patagonia describes this item as ‘soft, breathable, and ultra-light…weather-resistant protection…’.  This is fairly accurate but I wouldn’t count on this as your sole item for protection from the elements.  Even during a brief summer squall, this item gets wet fast.  Perhaps right off the shelf the DWR treatment will help it shed minimal precip but keep in mind the fact that DWR treatments wear off very quickly.

    My favorite application for this item is wind protection.  Lately I have been using the Houdini for skiing.  I wear a light-weight synthetic t-shirt, then a lightweight fleece, over that goes the Houdini, and finally a softshell layer.  The Houdini does breath very well and as long as the weather stays in the 20’s, I stay very comfortable.  In this application the Houdini blocks the wind that makes it through my softshell.  It also helps to hold in a little more body heat which keeps me warmer.  I like to wear the Houdini under my softshell to avoid ripping it on trees – it is EXTREMELY light-weight.

    Because of it’s small size and minimal weight, this item is unnoticed in a pack or even jacket pocket.  I have no reservations packing it on EVERY trip outdoors, in case I need just a little more then what I have.  I own an older version which had a fairly constricting hood that would NOT fit over a helmet and when zipped all the way up, felt like it was chocking me.  Apparently Patagonia has redesigned the hood to be more comfortable.  They have also redesigned the pocket on this newer rendition.  My version has an internal velcro pocket while the new version has an exterior zippered pocket.

    Overall, this unique item has been very useful and would be a welcome addition to anyone’s pack.  You might even be surprised at how often you use it, just be careful, it is ultra-lightweight!

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Patagonia Mens Simple Guide Pants review

Material: Stretch-woven polyester (w/ DWR treatment)

Features: Elastic waistband with draw-cord, 2 zippered side pockets, 1 zippered thigh pocket, gusseted crotch, articulated knees, reverse fly zipper, cuff securing tabs

Cost: $99


I’ve wanted to do a review of the Patagonia Simple Guide pants for quite a while now.  I realized that I don’t have a single review concerning pants – this was the catalyst.

On to the review.  The Simple Guide pants are a light-weight, technical softshell pant that will perform in a variety of conditions.  They have well-designed features and an athletic fit that makes them a great choice for almost any outdoor pursuit.

Climbing The Yellow Spur in Eldorado Canyon SP

I’ll start off by saying that I REALLY like the material that Patagonia chose for these pants.  It is surprisingly light-weight, stretchy, and very comfortable.  Breathability is stellar while durability is fair.  Initially water resistance was sufficient but with any regular use, the DWR treatment wears off quickly and will need to be re-applied for continued weather resistance.  Getting back to durability, after 3+ years of use there are no holes, all seams are intact including the welded thigh pocket, and the zippers still function like new.  There is apparent wear on the seat of the pants from glissading, rock climbing, and sitting that has led to faster water absorption.  Bottom line, even when new, don’t expect to stay dry with continued contact with snow or water.  But don’t look at this as a failure – these are light-weight softshell pants, they should only be expected to shed minimal precip at best.  They do however dry very quickly, off-setting the fact that they will get wet easily.

Pockets are on the smaller side, leaving room for small essentials like a compass, lip balm, small camera, or car keys.  Having zippers on all of the pockets helps to keep your items from falling out while climbing, skiing, or hiking.

Out for an early Winter trail ride

The articulated knees, gusseted crotch, and stretch of these pants allows for a wide range of movement (think figure 4’s, high-stepping, and other acrobatic feats of alpinism).  Keep in mind that these have a slim fit and some folks may want to size-up to feel comfortable (unless you like the slim euro look).  The reverse zippered fly is a nice feature, zipping up to open.  This gives you easier access to your ‘delicates’ while wearing a climbing harness.  The cuff tabs have small metal grommets so you can attach your pants to your boots with a piece of cord.  I have never used this feature and don’t really see the point (unless you are performing some extremely acrobatic movements and your pant legs start to ride up?).  The newest version of these pants has a separating waist with a button.  My pants don’t have this feature but it has never been a problem.

All things considered I think these pants are a great buy at $99.  Patagonia has a great warranty to back up their products (in case these didn’t perform well).  Some great thought and design went into creating these versatile pants.

 

Getting organized: the gear…

Current gear selection for my 2014 pct thru-hike attempt

Current gear selection for my 2014 pct thru-hike attempt

Ok, here it is, the blog article going over the gear I plan on using for my 2014 thru-hike.  While I occasionally indulge in gear-geekery, I try not to get caught up in all the little gadgets and gizmos designed for those of us that like to recreate outdoors.  Why?  Let me ask you this question, if no new gear was developed ever, would it prevent us from enjoying our outdoor pursuits?  The answer is most definitely no.  All those companies out there who come out with newer, lighter, more advanced gear are mostly doing so to have a new product to sell you.  Now I don’t want to give the impression that this gear isn’t great or that I don’t find some of this stuff fascinating and awesome. I have bought a few new pieces of gear specifically for my thru-hike.  I will however be using MOSTLY gear that I already owned.  The point I am getting at is that you should not feel the need to buy gear just because there is a newer, lighter, brighter-colored version.

I did think it would be fun to mention all the different gear and geek out for a bit in hopes that some of you who read this might have some suggestions for me to cut a bit of weight.  My base-weight at the moment is right about 20lbs.  I was hoping for something in between 10 and 15.  And while the 20lb weight includes some things that I will actually be wearing and not carrying on my back, there were a few items that I realize I did not add that I will in fact be bringing (stakes, socks, maybe some other small stuff…).

So lets get to the gear.

Starting on the top left of the photo above – the pack, one of my new gear acquisitions for the trail.  This is a Gregory Z55.  This is a size small and weighs in at just over 3 lbs.  It has a frame (yeah I’m not sure if frameless appeals to me for 2600+ miles) and 55 liters of capacity.  Gregory packs graciously provided this pack to me for use as an ambassador while on the trail, communicating with others about my experience using their gear.  Thanks guys, I look forward to putting the Z55 to the test!

On the far right of the picture are two sleeping bags.  A Rab neutrino 600 down bag and a Mountain Hardware ultra lamina synthetic bag.  Both are rated for 20 degrees.  I plan on using the down bag in the desert section and switching over to the synthetic bag once I hit the mountains.

As for upper body layers: Patagonia lightweight wool tshirt, Ibex hooded long-sleeved wool shirt, Patagonia R1 fleece, Montbell windbreaker vest, Montbell Fleece, Patagonia Houdini windbreaker, Wildthingz alpine shell, Patagonia Nanopuff hooded jacket.  I’m already planning on ditching the Ibex base layer and one fleece (probably the R1, even though I love it).  I may add arm warmers.  I may also ditch the Houdini even though it weighs next to nothing.  Count the ounces and the pounds mind themselves right?

Lower body layers include:  Montbell expedition weight wool long underwear, Rab hiking pants, Patagonia hiking shorts.  Socks (haven’t picked them out yet).  And hopefully a pair of wool boxers.

My tent is a Black Diamond beta-lite tarp (19oz).  It is made of sip-nylon, pitches with my trekking poles and gives surprisingly good weather protection – I have used it above 9k feet in Colorado during a spring snow storm, and on the coast of Maine in high winds.  It has held up well.  I am forgoing a footprint.  I have a Big Agnes sleeping pad as well as a silk sleeping bag liner.

I am currently using an MSR 6 liter dromedary bag with a drinking hose attachment.  I might look for a lighter weight camelbak bladder which will most likely have 3-4 liter capacity and have to add a few lightweight water bottles.

As for cooking I am using an MSR micro rocket stove (new this year) with an Evernew titanium pot (.7 liters I think).  I also have a long-handled Sea To Summit spoon and an MSR titanium mug.

As far as other small items, I have a journal, signal mirror, whistle, pen, Black Diamond headlamp, mosquito head net, blister treatment kit, SteriPen, wide-brimmed hat, GoPro, extra batteries, and backup water treatment (iodine).

I know I haven’t gone into much detail on these items, their individual weights, their strengths and weaknesses, etc. etc.  I’m hoping that I’ll figure out what works and what doesn’t work while I’m on the trail (and I plan to blog/tweet about it).  I will also likely add items at certain points such as ice axe and crampons, helmet, etc.

Ok, I’m already losing my patience for this post.  Those are the items I’m brining.  I will attempt to ditch roughly 5 pounds of gear in the next month to get my base weight down into the sub-15 pound zone, I’m sure my feet and back will thank me for it.  Any suggestions or criticism is appreciated!

Later!