Tag Archives: msr

Comprehensive PCT gear list

The following is a comprehensive list of all gear coming with me on my PCT thru-hike.  Weights included.  Item subject to change! Enjoy.

Big 3+

  • Rab Neutrino 600 sleeping bag – 34oz
  • Black Diamond BetaLite tarp tent – 21oz
  • MSR groundhog stakes (7) – 4.5oz
  • Exped SynMat UL 7 Small – 14oz
  • Gregory Z55 pack (straps cut down) 47oz

Total weight 120.5oz/

 

Clothing layers

  • North Face RDT lightweight rain shell – 12.5oz
  • Montbell ClimaAir Fleece – 12.5oz
  • Montbell ClimaPlus wind vest 6.25oz
  • Patagonia lightweight wool t – 4.75oz
  • Patagonia Strider shorts – 3.5oz
  • Montbell Ex. weight wool pants – 6oz
  • Pearl Izumi Elite thermal arm warmers – 2.75oz
  • Pearl Izumi Shine wind mitt/glove – 3oz
  • Mammut buff – 1.5oz
  • Sea to Summit bug headnet – 1oz

Total weight – 56.5oz/3.53lbs

 

Cookwear

  • Evernew Titanium .6L pot – 5oz
  • Sea to Summit long-handled spoon – .5oz
  • MSR MicroRocket stove – 2.75oz
  • MSR titanium mug – 2oz
  • Sawyer Mini filter – 4.5oz
  • CRKT Peck (knife) – 1oz
  • 3L Camelbak bladder – 7.25oz
  • 2 x Disposable 2L water bottles – weight currently unknown

Total weight – 23oz/1.44lbs

 

Random Items

  • McMurdo Fast Find PLB – 5.5oz
  • First Aid kit – 5.75oz
  • GoPro Hero3+ and accessories – 10oz
  • Black Diamond Icon headlamp – 8.25oz
  • Peppers Sunset Blvd polarized glasses – 1oz

    Total weight – 30.5oz/1.9lbs


 

Total weight of all items – 228.5oz/14.28

 

*other items are yet to be weighed and added i.e. cell phone/charger, additional camera, hat, sunglasses, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When lite IS right

In my quest to prepare for the PCT, I have found myself getting sucked into the game of shedding weight wherever possible. Recently I read a great article by Andrew Skurka “Stupid light”.  Andrew’s article gives some great examples of omitted gear that ultimately proved detrimental to his comfort and abilities on particular trips.  I thought I would give a few examples of my own to further illustrate weight savings, not safety 20140327-165842.jpgcompromise.

As I have been preparing for the trail, water treatment has been one of the areas that I have seen my strategy slowly evolve.  I originally intended to use a chemical purification product called AquaMira. I used this product on a NOLS semester course with success. In addition to its ability to make questionable water safer to drink, it had no unpleasant taste that I could detect in addition to being simple to use and light weight.  Unfortunately it is rather cost prohibitive at $11 (which treats 30 gallons).  I anticipate drinking more then 200 gallons of water during my PCT hike. This works out to a cost of roughly $75 for enough Aqua Mira for my entire hike.

I felt that I could do better then $75 so I looked to my Steri Pen Classic.  I bought it for $50 on sale at REI. Some benefits are the fact that it is chemical free and more compact then most filters. Upon researching this product however, I found that it will only purify roughly 100 liters (under ideal conditions) on one set of lithium batteries ($10).  This would cost roughly $80 for batteries in addition to the cost of the pen itself for a total of $130 for chemical free water purification for the duration of my hike.

Although I had entertained the idea of using bleach, which is highly cost effective and lightweight, I still have a 20140327-165831.jpghard time willingly putting chemicals in my body (even though chlorine is used to purify municiple water supplies…). Before I invested in a dropper bottle and bleach, I was lucky enough to come across the Saywer Mini water filter.  This little gem is compact, easy to use, and for $25, will purify 100,000 gallons.  Also, in my quest to shed unnecessary weight, this filter comes in at 1.5oz less then the Steri Pen including a collapsible water bottle, straw attachment, flushing syringe and stuff sack. If I leave behind a few of these accessories, I can get the weight down to 1.6oz, almost 5oz less then the Steri Pen!  This is a rare instance where the lighter option is also much cheaper (unheard of when shedding ounces) and is actually simpler to use without sacrificing function.

After having so much success in reducing my gear weight with water treatment, I reevaluated my stove – the MSR Microrocket. This little piece of metal is already light, weighing in at 4.5oz including all the accessories. These additional accessories include a hard plastic case as well as a piezoelectric igniter.  Separating these items and putting the stove back on the scale revealed a weight savings of 1.75oz. Leaving behind a plastic case and igniter (redundant items since the stove can stow in my cooking pot and I will still carry a lighter) is a safe move that doesn’t jeopardize my safety or comfort, two important factors to consider when taking items out of your pack.

20140327-165837.jpgOne last example of weight savings is my choice to forgo a long sleeve shirt.  I initially planned on bringing a wool tshirt as well as a long sleeve shirt.  While it would be nice to have to two layers, I came across my biking arm warmers.  I substituted the arm warmers for the long sleeved shirt – a moderate weight savings which doesn’t sacrifice my ability to cover my arms for added warmth or protection from the sun.

With all of these substitutions and omissions, the main question I asked myself was, ‘am I threatening my safety?’.  In all of these examples the answer was no, allowing me to make these weight saving changes without threatening my well-being on the trail.  I recommend using the same criteria when making decisions about your own gear choices – good luck and happy hiking!

 

Getting organized: the gear…

Current gear selection for my 2014 pct thru-hike attempt

Current gear selection for my 2014 pct thru-hike attempt

Ok, here it is, the blog article going over the gear I plan on using for my 2014 thru-hike.  While I occasionally indulge in gear-geekery, I try not to get caught up in all the little gadgets and gizmos designed for those of us that like to recreate outdoors.  Why?  Let me ask you this question, if no new gear was developed ever, would it prevent us from enjoying our outdoor pursuits?  The answer is most definitely no.  All those companies out there who come out with newer, lighter, more advanced gear are mostly doing so to have a new product to sell you.  Now I don’t want to give the impression that this gear isn’t great or that I don’t find some of this stuff fascinating and awesome. I have bought a few new pieces of gear specifically for my thru-hike.  I will however be using MOSTLY gear that I already owned.  The point I am getting at is that you should not feel the need to buy gear just because there is a newer, lighter, brighter-colored version.

I did think it would be fun to mention all the different gear and geek out for a bit in hopes that some of you who read this might have some suggestions for me to cut a bit of weight.  My base-weight at the moment is right about 20lbs.  I was hoping for something in between 10 and 15.  And while the 20lb weight includes some things that I will actually be wearing and not carrying on my back, there were a few items that I realize I did not add that I will in fact be bringing (stakes, socks, maybe some other small stuff…).

So lets get to the gear.

Starting on the top left of the photo above – the pack, one of my new gear acquisitions for the trail.  This is a Gregory Z55.  This is a size small and weighs in at just over 3 lbs.  It has a frame (yeah I’m not sure if frameless appeals to me for 2600+ miles) and 55 liters of capacity.  Gregory packs graciously provided this pack to me for use as an ambassador while on the trail, communicating with others about my experience using their gear.  Thanks guys, I look forward to putting the Z55 to the test!

On the far right of the picture are two sleeping bags.  A Rab neutrino 600 down bag and a Mountain Hardware ultra lamina synthetic bag.  Both are rated for 20 degrees.  I plan on using the down bag in the desert section and switching over to the synthetic bag once I hit the mountains.

As for upper body layers: Patagonia lightweight wool tshirt, Ibex hooded long-sleeved wool shirt, Patagonia R1 fleece, Montbell windbreaker vest, Montbell Fleece, Patagonia Houdini windbreaker, Wildthingz alpine shell, Patagonia Nanopuff hooded jacket.  I’m already planning on ditching the Ibex base layer and one fleece (probably the R1, even though I love it).  I may add arm warmers.  I may also ditch the Houdini even though it weighs next to nothing.  Count the ounces and the pounds mind themselves right?

Lower body layers include:  Montbell expedition weight wool long underwear, Rab hiking pants, Patagonia hiking shorts.  Socks (haven’t picked them out yet).  And hopefully a pair of wool boxers.

My tent is a Black Diamond beta-lite tarp (19oz).  It is made of sip-nylon, pitches with my trekking poles and gives surprisingly good weather protection – I have used it above 9k feet in Colorado during a spring snow storm, and on the coast of Maine in high winds.  It has held up well.  I am forgoing a footprint.  I have a Big Agnes sleeping pad as well as a silk sleeping bag liner.

I am currently using an MSR 6 liter dromedary bag with a drinking hose attachment.  I might look for a lighter weight camelbak bladder which will most likely have 3-4 liter capacity and have to add a few lightweight water bottles.

As for cooking I am using an MSR micro rocket stove (new this year) with an Evernew titanium pot (.7 liters I think).  I also have a long-handled Sea To Summit spoon and an MSR titanium mug.

As far as other small items, I have a journal, signal mirror, whistle, pen, Black Diamond headlamp, mosquito head net, blister treatment kit, SteriPen, wide-brimmed hat, GoPro, extra batteries, and backup water treatment (iodine).

I know I haven’t gone into much detail on these items, their individual weights, their strengths and weaknesses, etc. etc.  I’m hoping that I’ll figure out what works and what doesn’t work while I’m on the trail (and I plan to blog/tweet about it).  I will also likely add items at certain points such as ice axe and crampons, helmet, etc.

Ok, I’m already losing my patience for this post.  Those are the items I’m brining.  I will attempt to ditch roughly 5 pounds of gear in the next month to get my base weight down into the sub-15 pound zone, I’m sure my feet and back will thank me for it.  Any suggestions or criticism is appreciated!

Later!