Category Archives: Travel

Where the hell have I been?

I am JACKED right now.  The caffein in this americano is helping me remember days spent in the café in the town of Lone Pine, California, biding my time while my shin splints healed.  The further the PCT recedes into my rearview, the more precious the memories become that I can still hold onto.  Just last night Banana Boat and I enjoyed some FaceTime, recounting our glory days while we struggle to find as much pleasure in regular life.

My last post was back in July?  Wow.  I had just gotten off the trail and found myself newly located in Hollywood…Hollywierd.  If ever there were a place more at odds with my personality, I’d like to experience it, just for a moment for some perspective.  Believe it or not I am enjoying my time here.  I am enjoying my time with my Father and his partner, both of whom I have only seen occasionally in the past 10+ years.  I have also had the chance to re-connect with an old middle school friend not to mention make a bunch of new friends.  Overall the social experience here has been quite pleasant.  I am glad to report that the more places I find myself living, even temporarily, it’s always possible to find cool, interesting, genuine people.

The boys, the Man about to burn behind us.

The boys, the Man about to burn behind us.

Speaking of interesting social experiences, I just returned from Burning Man.  The only thing you REALLY need to know about the experience is that it was life-changing and I will be going back.  Without writing and exhausting narrative of my 12 days in the desert vortex, I feel like it is my duty to correct some common misconceptions about this gathering.  First of all, this is not a concert or music festival.  Music is a major part of the event but it is only part of the experience.  Not EVERYONE is nude.  In fact, naked or partially naked people are definitely a minority at Burning Man, although you might not think so based on popular images of the event.  Either way, not everyone chooses to whip out their goodies.  Along the same train of thought, Burning Man is not some crazy sex-romp.  Sure, it could be a sexual experience if one was seeking that kind of adventure but again, you would be a minority.  It was for a couple of these main reasons that previously I never attended the event – mostly because a significant other didn’t want me going to this magical place.  Understandable (although ridiculous at the same time if you really KNOW me).

So what IS Burning Man?  Well, you can read about the guiding principles on the BM website if you want a definition.  The best way I can describe the event is PURE LOVE.  I have never previously been in a social environment that is so caring and accepting of ‘the individual’.  EVERYONE is welcomed into the Black Rock Desert and received with a warm hug and respect.  In this desolate wasteland you will embody your truest self and everyone will love you for your bravery and honesty.  Ok, enough about that – the take home message here is that if you have EVER had even the slightest interest in Burning Man, you should go.  I will post a link as soon as our time-lapse video is done being edited and online.

After 12 days of travel, music, very little sleep, and immersion into this new culture, I returned to Los Angeles.

Since my return I have been very actively seeking work.  I am slowly wondering why I choose

Some graphic design fun

Some graphic design fun

such an obscure major in college.  I have applied to MANY jobs, most of which have not even returned phone calls or sent confirmation emails, assuring me they have received my resumé.  This is a competitive job market.  All (most) PA work on films is usually unpaid unless you have previous experience…ok.  Serving/restaurant jobs all require 2-4 years serving experience…ok.  Basically catch 22 kind of stuff.  I do have my second interview since getting here tomorrow.  It is what it is.

For President 2016

For President 2016

I have started doing some freelance graphic design on the side, building my portfolio and learning as I go.  My online portfolio can be found here if you have any interest.

I am trying to stay positive by doing fun things (that don’t cost much money) during the weekend when friends have time off from work.  Most recently we went down to San Diego county and surfed at San Onofre State Beach (just

Foot - 0  Shell - 1

Foot – 0 Shell – 1

North of the old nuclear reactor).  That evening we camped at the State Park.  Great time with great friends.  My friend Jeremy put together a great little video shot and edited entirely on his iPhone 6.  You can find it here, San OnofreSurf Day.

Morning drinking is the best drinking

Morning drinking is the best drinking

Ok, I’m losing interest so instead of rambling I will end this post.  Thanks for following along, will try to make the updates a bit more regular.

Dirtbag World

I’ve been sitting in the small cafe now for about an hour.  The staff mill about behind the counter, refilling refrigerated coolers and food prep stations.  Chris is reading the LA Times which I have already thumbed through.  I read an article about the impacts of recreational marijuana legalization on states bordering Colorado as well as a few other paragraphs from different news stories.  A mudslide in Colorado, a psychotic killer in Southern California, a promise from the President to Veterens, etc., etc., and so forth, and so on.  I put the paper down and begin writing this blog article.  A few minutes later Choop walks in the door, high-fiving Chris.  The two just met yesterday, just as Chris and myself met this past week.  One minute we were total strangers, the next all sharing living and sleeping quarters in the tiny town of Lone Pine, California.  Is my world really the same world I was reading about only 20 minutes ago in the newspaper?

I glance up at the flat screen looming in my periphery, images of Katy, Jennifer, and other beautiful celebrities flash across the screen before and add for some terrible movie involving who-knows-what.  It’s all very distracting and it’s very common.  Have you ever taken note of how many flashing panels of moronic nonsense fill YOUR periphery?  In a society that is shocked by violent outbursts fueled by sexual frustration, is it so hard to see the media shoving violence and sex in your face every chance they get?  Don’t get me wrong, I’m terribly disturbed and saddened by the recent tragedy that took place in SoCal and I feel for those poor people who were affected.

But trail life is different.  I’ve hiked roughly 700 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail this season so far and I foresee myself making it to Yosemite Valley, maybe further before I have to return to ‘real life’.  But wait, the trail life IS my real life.  *Ring Ring* My cell phone screen comes to life and my Father is on the other end telling me that I need to figure out the registration on my car.  It expires in two months…ahhh, the REAL world is calling.

Back to the issue at hand.  I’ve been sleeping in the back yard of a friend I made less then a week ago, with two other friends I met in the woods.  The house we were welcomed into remains unlocked so we can come and go as we please, use the kitchen, take a shower, whatever we need.  This is my reality right now.  It’s this beautiful alternate-reality I have talked about previously.  It’s the community of like minded individuals who value relationships, travel, experience.  They remain undistracted by all the bullshit that’s flashed in front of our faces like a steak in front of hungry dogs.  We don’t bite or even lunge.  Our satisfaction is found in the aerie crags, the evening conversations over a beer, the afternoon dip in an icy mountain stream.  It’s true, our lives are touched by all that pervades society.  Divorce, suicide, loss, and sadness.  In the open-natured hearts of the characters I’ve meet we’ve discussed all of these issues.  A sort of therapy session exists out here that you don’t pay for in dollars but instead earn in sweat.  

Now I’m glancing up at a commercial for furniture – NO INTEREST, LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS, BUY NOW!  It reminds me of the impermanence of our existence.  We accumulate stuff for the purpose of…what exactly, I’m not sure.  We can’t take it with us to the next life.  My experience is that the more crap you own, the less freedom you can easily find.  Less then a year ago I gave away my furniture, sold my beloved blender, packed all the rest of my life into my Subaru and submitted to the call to go West.  It was a good decision.

And with impermanence in mind, I realize that these friends, these dirtbag, homeless, traveling friends will continue their journeys.  We are here for only a short moment, the intersection of four people’s dreams and adventures converging at this special in time and place.  Maybe this is the only adventure we will share together or maybe our trajectories will cross again, it’s uncertain.  What is certain is the beauty of this existence – this adventure together.  It’s far from a ‘typical’ lifestyle, but from what I see flashing across the TV screen right now, I’m glad that we are experiencing something different.

Thoughts and ideas on the PCT: Lone Pine, California

Friends!  Family!  Acquaintances, hiker trash, travelers, walkers of all continents, hello!  I’ve been looking for an opportunity to sit down and write for quite some time now, a difficult prospect given my current lifestyle.  Walking along the PCT, the last thing I find myself wanting to do is sit

Just outside Big Bear City.

Just outside Big Bear City.

down and write although my head is filled with stories and ideas.  There are worthwhile, interesting adventures around every corner, certainly worthy of my time for reflection.  In this world of technology and modern conveniences you might think it would happen easily, but no!  When you are walking 20 miles a day, life becomes simplified – wake, eat, walk, eat, sleep, repeat.

Here I am in Lone Pine, California, taking a break from my long walk North.  I have covered some 700 miles by foot and find myself resting in this wonderful town on the edge of the Eastern Sierra Nevada mountains.  The massive granite monolith that is Mt. Whitney, among many other prominent peaks, stare down at us eager travelers.  It’s as if they say, “come to this high wild place, bring only your sense of adventure”.  We marvel at their beauty, we are drawn in like moths to a light.  Mt. Whitney is the highest peak in the lower 48 states and it’s not even on our immediate route but we are drawn to it.  Before I elaborate on my current location and what lies ahead, I will get a little abstract.

Banana Boat trying to get us a ride out of Lake Isabella, quite challenging.

Banana Boat trying to get us a ride out of Lake Isabella, quite challenging.

Let’s address the idea of trail time – it’s a kind of time travel, alternate reality situation.  I was in Idyllwild roughly a month ago.  The terrain and time covered by foot since then has given me a sense of great distances that have been lost to modern modes of travel.  It’s possible to cover large distances by car, train, or airplane in a single day.  Traveling by foot however quickly transports us back to a time when the world was a BIG place.  All of a sudden 20 miles has a much different feel – it’s not an easy distance to cover, at first.  The hiker who is new to long-distance travel will quickly find that with determination and hard work, walking 30, 40, maybe even 50 miles in a single day is attainable.  But don’t worry, the world is still a big place within the limits of walking.

Idyllwild was a great mountain town and I enjoyed the cool air and breezes there for two days.

In the pavilion at kick off, waiting out the rain.

In the pavilion at kick off, waiting out the rain.

Continuing North, I headed up over San Jacinto peak and then down Fuller Ridge into White Water, CA.  There I stayed with Ziggy and the Bear, wonderfully elderly trail angels who greeted us with cold drinks and open hearts.  My first big eat-a-thon at the Morongo casino was a welcome adventure before getting a ride with our friend Sandizzle back down to Lake Morena State Park for ADZPCTKO, the annual PCT kick off event.  Backtracking the miles we had hiked from Lake Morena jolted us back to ‘small world’ as we moved at incredible speeds thanks to good old ‘Merican fossil fuel.

Kick Off was enjoyable but I think my favorite part of the event was seeing all the ultralight gear put to the test as a low pressure system moved through, bringing with it torrential rain and wind gusts up to the 50s.  A $500 cuben fiber tent might weight 1 pound, but does it hold up in

Eating some lunch with Banana Boat and C-Lion

Eating some lunch with Banana Boat and C-Lion

these blustery conditions?  I will admit, that evening when the weather was the worst, I awoke at 3am to my tent walls deflecting the wind and rain.  As I lay there awake, two of my tent stakes simultaneously pulled out of the ground and my tarp collapsed on my face.  Scrambling for my headlamp and rain shell, I jumped out of my former fortress in an attempt to re-pitch my house.  I worked as fast as possible, the whole time thinking in my head, ‘don’t let your down bag get wet’.  Although I got soaked in the process, all my gear that was under my tarp stayed dry and within about 20 minutes I was sleeping once again.

Me reclining by the 1/4 distance marker.

Me reclining by the 1/4 distance marker.

Making our way back to the trail from kickoff proved more difficult then I originally anticipated.

Resting after 6000 feet of climbing.

Resting after 6000 feet of climbing.

The ride board that was supposed to help us hikers hook up with people who might drive us to our desired destinations was not as useful as expected.  I had come to kickoff with Roi, Sarit, and Arctic but I found myself driving North with a different group of hikers.  I was sad to leave my friends but the opportunity of an open seat in a car could not be passed up.  I took one more partial day off when I got back to Ziggy and the Bear’s house before sprinting North, covering 98 miles in 3 days.

From White Water I began the long climb to Big Bear, another small mountain town in SoCal.  It was during this stretch that I reconnected with my friend Borealis who was also down at kick off.  The two of us enjoyed an evening of camping together before the 6000 foot climb.  I had an afternoon resupplying in Big Bear where I met a lovely trail angel named Alicia who offered to drive me back to the trail.

From Big Bear the trail jogged West and took us towards Silverwood Lake State Park and then down to Cajon Pass.  My Dad and his Partner drove up from LA to meet me at this major road crossing and had lunch together before they took me to purchase more food.  I was excited and

Near Swarthout Canyon, just passed Cajon Pass.

Near Swarthout Canyon, just passed Cajon Pass.

dreading the next section of the trail – the biggest climb on the PCT, from Cajon Pass to Wrightwood, over 7000 feet in one single push.  Wrightwood was AWESOME.  One of my hiking friends, C-Lion has some friends that live there who welcomed us into their home.  Steve and Shannon fed us baby back ribs, tacos and beer.  They brought us to their local country club for a relaxing afternoon.  They made us feel like family and we will be forever grateful for their kindness and generosity.

We were apprehensive to leave Wrightwood but knew that we needed to continue North.  We climbed out of town towards Mt.Baden Powell where the ancient trees showed their character.  Days of hiking took us into the small town of Agua Dulce where the famous Hiker Heaven can be found.  When I met Donna Saufley I was greeted with a big hug even though I hadn’t showered in a week.  We were given showers, internet, mailing services, cots to sleep on, and rides into town.  C-Lion, Banana Boat and I got a ride to REI to pick up some needed supplies.  Banana Boat’s Aunts and Uncles meet us and treated us to a large Mexican lunch where we

Climbing a nice old tree on Mt.Baden Powell.

Climbing a nice old tree on Mt.Baden Powell.

feasted on burritos.  We were amazed by our appetites and less then an hour after this meal we stopped into In And Out for burgers and milkshakes.

From the Saufley’s, we took one long day and hiked straight to Casa De Luna, aka The Anderson’s place.  Terry welcomed us in and once again we felt the love.  Dinner and breakfast were generously provided for us hungry hikers.  Although we would have loved to stay we continued out the next day, making a brief stop into the Rock Inn for second breakfast.  I let my friends get ahead of me while I made some overdue phone calls before hitching forward about 12 miles and then walking the last few miles on the road into Hiker Town.  This funky little ‘village’ was a nice afternoon stop, but after raiding the hiker box for supplies, we continued hiking at 5 o’clock that evening to get some miles done in the cool of the evening.  We hiked until 2 in the morning,

Hiking through wind farms is pretty cool.

Hiking through wind farms is pretty cool.

collapsing into a pile of unconsciousness, surrounded by wind turbines in the desert.

Continuing North to Tehachapi our friend C-Lion came to the conclusion that he needed to get off trail for a bit to deal with some real life stuff.  He rented a car and Banana Boat and I drove down to San Diego with him to say good bye.  We were welcomed and enjoyed a nice good bye dinner that evening before getting some good rest.  The next morning we woke up very early so that we could drive through LA to stop in at my Dad’s house to wish him a belated birthday and enjoy some coffee and doughnuts.  I grabbed a few pieces of gear that I needed and we made our way North, back to Tehachapi.  Banana and I finished our resupply and did some night hiking that evening, again finding ourselves sleeping under wind turbines.

Hiking through Vasquez Rocks outside Agua Dulce.

Hiking through Vasquez Rocks outside Agua Dulce.

Walker pass was the next major milestone which we reached.  This area was exciting in the sense that there are no natural water sources, just a couple caches.  After some extended

Having fun near Silverwood Lake State Park with C-Lion, Pilsbury, Star Rider, and Dawn Patrol.

Having fun near Silverwood Lake State Park with C-Lion, Pilsbury, Star Rider, and Dawn Patrol.

waterless stretches of hiking, we made it to Walker where Banana and I hitched into Lake Isabella.  We ate pizza and bought more food before attempting to get back to the trail.  2+ hours of attempted hitching got us nowhere until one of the guys who was working at the pizza joint saw us and gave us a ride 10 miles up the road.  More unsuccessful hitching and eventually a couple that had driven by multiple times offered us a ride if we could just give them some gas money.  We happily took this ride and ended up sleeping at Walker Pass that evening before getting back to our march North.

From Walker Pass we began the climb to

Outside Wrightwood, CA.

Outside Wrightwood, CA.

Kennedy Meadows, the gateway to the Eastern Sierras.  We got very lucky with weather (we had mailed our tents and rain gear ahead from Tehachapi to Kennedy Meadows to save weight).  As we walked into town a weather system moved through bringing rain (and snow to the higher elevations).  Banana and I enjoyed the company of many other friends in town for two days at the General Store in front of the wood stove.  Temperatures dropped into the 30’s at night, we were in the mountains again.  Due to some personal obligations, I made the decision to skip the next 50 miles of trail and get a ride from Kennedy Meadows down to Lone Pine to take care of some legal paperwork (which I ended up not being able to accomplish, F you Boulder County court system!).  I had also developed some painful shin splints in the last 100 miles of hiking and this was a good opportunity for rest

On the summit of Baden Powell with Banana Boat and C-Lion.

On the summit of Baden Powell with Banana Boat and C-Lion.

and recovery before my friend Megan arrives and we head back into the mountains on the John Muir Trail section of the hike that begins here.

Upon arriving in Lone Pine I met some very friendly climbers who welcomed me into their home and let me put my tent in their back yard.  The experience here has been wonderful.

Wow, that was a lot of stuff to catch up on.  Hopefully it didn’t get too boring although I’ll admit that after typing 1800 words I got a bit bored.  It was fun to recall all of the events that led to this moment, a rare moment in every day life but quite a common one of the PCT.  It really is amazing how complete strangers will relate to you like you are an old friend, doing what they can to make this epic journey a little more realistic.

Sunrise on the Tehachapi wind farm.

Sunrise on the Tehachapi wind farm.

Greetings from Idyllwild, California

Well my friends, followers, family, and anyone else stumbling across my writing here, I am in Idyllwild, California.  We (Roi, Sarah, Blake and I) arrived yesterday, driven by our trail friend Evil Goat.  Since getting here, we have eaten ice cream, cooked on a real stove, slept in beds, and resupplied ourselves with the essential items to continue enjoying our lives on the trail.  I personally have had some time to catch up on my journaling, something I am doing daily to document my adventure, a tangible, written memento of what has been.  Some more creative writing in a bit, but for now, here are my journal entries from the past few days.

Desert floor far below.

Desert floor far below.


4/17/2014 Day 7 – Zero day (resting, no mileage)

Very chill day – relaxing with foot baths, food (amazing breakfast scramble), beer, live music courtesy of Roi and Monty and reunions!

After relaxing most of the day, Amanda and I went into town to pick

Sarah, Sunbeam, Amanda, Mike and the famous Monty.

Sarah, Sunbeam, Amanda, Mike and the famous Monty.

up Sunbeam and Mike.  Not too much else today.  Mailed out a resupply to Ziggy and The Bear.  Dinner at Monty’s and back on the trail in the morning!


 

4/18/2014 Day 8 – Warner Springs to Mile 127 (trail angel Mike’s) – 17 Miles

Staying with Monty was a really wonderful experience.  It’s not often you meet someone so selfless, who spends his time and energy helping other people achieve their goals.

After our zero at Monty’s house, we were anxious to get on the trail and bust out some miles.  But of course, we needed to eat a huge

Following Roi on a longer climb in the desert.

Following Roi on a longer climb in the desert.

gut-bomb breakfast.  Spinach and cheese omelets and biscuits and gravy…sausage gravy – the best I’ve ever had.  I had a second helping and coffee as well.

In a blaze of gear-shifting and glory, we braced ourselves for warp speed.  We rocketed towards Warner Springs in the bed of the old pickup, arriving at the trail head in a fury, ready to move.  We thanked Monty for his hospitality and began another day.

The hiking went by as if we were floating, our legs and feet energized and restless from rest.  Before we knew it, the map confirmed 15 miles.  After suggestions from multiple people to stop in at trail angel Mikes, we knew where we were headed.

I ran into Blake at the top of the ranch driveway and neither of us knew what to expect.  We heard rumors of beer, music, food, and

Lots of new faces and good company at trail angel Mike's house.

Lots of new faces and good company at trail angel Mike’s house.

good company.  We were not disappointed.

Everyone I have met in the past week was already telling tails from the journey.  Many new faces showed up today too which is always and enlightened social experience.  There was beer, food, we played music, we met new faces and had a grand time.  Now we sleep.


 

4/19/2014 Day 9 – Miles 127 to Paradise Cafe – 25 miles

Long day – 25 miles.  We stayed at Mike’s place last night and slept out on the porch.  We awoke early to the smell of food cooking.

Tom had the stove up and coffee slowly brewing.  Most other hikers left before sunrise but I took my time.  I drank three cups which woke me up.

Evil Goat, watering his blueberries, what a great trail friend and host!

Evil Goat, watering his blueberries, what a great trail friend and host!

I said my goodbyes and was out the gate running (not literally).  The weather was nice and the first ten miles went by easily – made it to Tule spring by 11:30.

I took a nice rest, filtered water, ate food, washed socks, and dried out the feet.  Roi and Sarah caught up and after some discussion, we decided to push another 15 miles to the Paradise Cafe.  A big burger was in our future.

The last miles dragged a bit but some iphone music helped with that.  Finally we climbed up the side of Table mountain and the road came into sight.  I practically ran down the last mile of trail and was thrilled to see a sign offering free rides to the Paradise for hikers.

We waited a short while for Lee, Brent, and Blake before calling for our ride.  We joked about how we must smell as we loaded into the

GoPro selfie in the desert

GoPro selfie in the desert

van.

As we ate huge (HUGE) burgers and drank IPA, Evil Goat arrived and told stories while we got stuffed.  He offered to let us spend the night at his place.

Blake and I got the RV and Roi and Sarah got the guest room.  We all shared a beer before passing out.


 

4/20/2014 Day 10 – Zero day – Ride from Anza to Idyllwild, CA

We were up around 7 and drinking coffee in Goat’s kitchen shortly after.  He treated us to coffee cake and Mexican breakfast with chorizo sausage.

We spent the morning talking with each other, hearing many storied from Goat’s experience working in Iraq.  We relaxed.

Enjoying the spoils of a 'hiker box' outside of Anza, CA.

Enjoying the spoils of a ‘hiker box’ outside of Anza, CA.

Before long we were in the car making the climb to Idyllwild where we thanked and said goodbye to Goat.

The rest of the afternoon was spent exploring town.  We ate ice cream and I found gaiters and sandals.  We also got some beer.

Our room at the Idyllwild Inn is surprisingly nice.  Wish I had more money saved to indulge a bit more in town!

Arctic aka Blake going through his bounce box (or bucket!) in Idyllwild.

Arctic aka Blake going through his bounce box (or bucket!) in Idyllwild.


 

Some additional thoughts…

For anyone hiking the trail this year, I have some advice.  Learn about and visit any and all trail angels.  In my planning process I put very little time into learning about the trail angels that give so much of their time and energy to us thru-hikers.  These people go out of their way to make the experience of hiking much more then just getting from point A to point B.  They are a diverse group of people who all share one common quality – they love the trail and actively support us in our quest to hike it.

The first trail angel that I want to give a special shout out to is Warner Springs Monty.  This former through hiker has a big heart and welcomed up into his home without hesitation.

I first saw his name on a piece of paper that was taped under the overpass at Scissors Crossing.  It was upside down on the concrete wall in front of me and initially, I didn’t even take the time to read it.  After camping near the highway that night, I was preparing my pack the following morning when I finally cocked my head sideways to see what was printed on this piece of paper.  The gist of the note was simple – Monty would pick you up, give you a place to sleep, food, shower, and laundry.  There was no fee although it was suggested that you make a donation based on what you could afford.  In all honestly I thought of this opportunity as a great way to save a little bit of money getting some of my needs met.  I copied down the phone number on the piece of paper before setting off for a long day of hiking.

Eventually I made it to Warner Springs and after a double cheese burger from the resource center, I decided to give Monty a call and see if he had room for me at his house.  A quirky man answered the phone and after I introduced myself, he said something like, ‘I bet you’re looking for some food, a shower, some laundry, and a place to sleep, right?’.  Of course this was exactly what I was looking for and after Monty explained that his house was not a ‘party house’, he said he would be more then happy to pick me up.

Roi and Sarah had already talked to Monty earlier that day and they were planning on going to spend the night at his house also.  We all agreed to a 2 o’clock pick up time and made sure we were all there when Monty arrived.  Another hiker by the trail name Santa’s Helper decided to come with us as well.

When Monty finally rolled up in his old, brown pickup truck, he was not exactly the man I had pictured in my head.  Younger and more spry then he sounded on the phone, Monty burst out of the driver seat and introduced himself.  We asked if we could get a ride to the post office to pick up our resupply packages and he quickly agreed and told us to load up.  I couldn’t immediately locate my ID and fumbled with my pack while I heard Monty say something like ‘I should know better then to wait around for hikers’.  HAH!  I didn’t want to be left behind so I grabbed my whole pack and tossed it in the bed before quickly hopping in myself.  Roi and Blake also jumped in and we were off.

Without going into every other detail of our stay with Monty in painstaking detail I’ll distill our experience into a final paragraph.  Monty turned out to be an amazing host.  His impatience is simply his nature and I learned to love this quality and almost find some humor in it remarking to Amanda, ‘When Monty is ready to go, he is READY TO GO.’  He cooked us breakfast and dinner, piling food on our plates multiple times until we had no room left.  He told us stories of his life, hiking long distances with little weight.  Monty turned out to be an awesome musician, jamming with Roi for about 3 hours, having us sing along with some classics as well as some of his own original songs (all stolen from other musicians he joked).

As Monty drove us back into town so we could continue our hike, I realized something (I think I actually realized it sooner).  This experience was MUCH more then just having an inexpensive place to eat and sleep.  This was the experience of a human being, selflessly sharing his love of something with other people who have that same love.  Travelers and adventurers seek experience, not tangible things.  Monty is that traveler and that adventurer.  He has been formed by the amazing experiences and interactions that only the trail can offer.  He has sought to provide these same experiences for those of us following in the footsteps that he and others have pioneered.  He asks nothing in return.  Enjoying the experience is his toll and it is a rich bounty that money could never purchase.  I want to say, THANK YOU Monty, a hundred times over.  Your caring and enthusiasm has enriched my experience and I only shared your company at mile 109!  I have 2500+ more miles to meet other people like yourself.

Any hikers coming up the trail behind me, give Monty a call and if he has room, stay with him, even if it’s for one evening.  Put some money (it doesn’t have to be a lot) in the donation jug to help him continue doing the amazing things he does for us.

Siestas are a great way to dry out your nasty-ass feet and rehydrate without carrying excessive amounts of water ON the trail.  Tule Spring.

Siestas are a great way to dry out your nasty-ass feet and rehydrate without carrying excessive amounts of water ON the trail. Tule Spring.

Letting some creativity flow

Home

The ceiling is about six feet above my head.  A smooth white surface, crisscrossed with a grid of dark, aged wooden beams, the echos of my typing fingers bouncing off of it back down at me.  I bring my gaze down to the ledge running the length of the wall in front of me which supports black and white images of a memorial and the interior an extravagant house.  The table which this computer rests on matches the color of the wood on the ceiling and has two abstract gold vases centered on it.  To my right are mirror-backed, lighted cabinets, no doubt intended to display something elegant. They are empty.

The hotel has been around for a while, exactly how long I can’t be sure.  The lobby hints at an earlier decade with it’s marble and brass.  Old elevators can’t deny their age either.  This temporary home would be comfortable for someone with much higher standards then myself. I am only a guest here.  A traveling passenger, living in this home away from home away from home.  Can I even call this state home?

The idea of home is a place that is always there, at least that is how I interpret it.  Our quest for something that doesn’t change in a world that thrives on change.  How natural is this scenario?When a mature tree crashes (silently?) to the ground in the forest, opportunists germinate and race to fill this sun-drenched void.  How warmly would we welcome those who, in the wake of a disaster, rushed in and built a house on our old foundation?  Can this succession that is the law of nature be tamed?

I’m about to carry my home with me for five months.  It’s really not too difficult.  It fits in my hand.  A home as impermanent as this is erected in two minutes time and disassembled just as quickly.  It offers a place to sleep and stay dry.  This is minimalism.  But it’s not just my ‘home’ that is simpler these days.  In six days I will become a nomad (more of a nomad anyway).

In six days I will place my hand on a cluster of wooden posts that rise out of the desert sands on the Mexican boarder and gaze North.  With an improbably small backpack, I will close my eyes for a fleeting moment and think ‘this is it’.  In six days I will begin walking and I won’t stop for five months.

As a traveler on the Pacific Crest Trail, I will sleep and wake on Gaia’s schedule. The straight lines and concrete and plastic of our civilized society will give way to salt brush, cacti, rock and sand.  The curving, rolling landscape which flows beneath my feet funnels me North.  An untold diversity of plants, animals, and landforms is waiting just ahead and I will see it all.

Gasoline-powered landscaping equipment is humming outside the wall to my left.  Water rushes through piping to a shower head down the hall.  On the sideboard that is level with my eyes, sculptures of ginko leaves, made from some silver metal reflect the searing white-yellow filaments of bulbs hanging above my head.  This ‘home’ is not my home.  My home is the trail, and I will be there in six short days.

…still touring Cali

Today I said good bye to my Aunt and Uncle who I have been staying with for the past three days in Gilroy, California. I had a wonderful visit.

The older we get, the more our relationships with relatives can evolve. I have always felt a strong connection with my Aunt and Uncle. They exude kindness and love for their family and having this time with them to talk about life, love, careers, and traveling has made me feel even closer with them. Their love for each other is evident every day. They just recently celebrated their fourty-fifth anniversary, a milestone for which their relationship has remained strong.  I am so proud of everything they have achieved together in love and life and I aspire to find the happiness that they share with one another.

After leaving Gilroy, I drove north to San Francisco where I will be for the next five days. I am visiting my friend Kristin and her mom Kathy as well as my friend Kate – all people I grew up with back in Connecticut.  It’s so nice to spend some time with friends before setting out on my hike which is days away…holy hell.

Our main goal is to get Kristin moved into her new apartment.  Luckily I have the forester for us to move large items. Going to keep this post short for now – will write something a bit more interesting in a few days.